Funny Irish Poems

Funny Irish poems have a special appeal to all genuine and honorary Irish people. Is it the leprechaun? The four-leaf clover? Is it a bit of blarney? Whatever it is, these poems are fun and yours to share. Please read our terms of use.

Wouldn't it be fun if we all could be Irish?

The first funny Irish poem is all about the famous Irish gift of gab. Although this gift is more likely fueled by Guinness, there is the legend of the Blarney stone. This stone is very inconveniently placed in the base of the Blarney Castle in the city of Blarney, in County Cork. Ireland. People have to practically bend over backward to kiss it, (and then there is the matter of germs, but I digress...) A kiss on the Blarney stone is supposed to give you the gift of gab. Not ordinary gab. Persuasive gab.

Please enjoy this first funny poem:


The Blarney Stone
In the Village of Blarney
There’s one magic stone.
They say when you kiss it,
You’re put in “the zone.”
You talk and you gab and
Your words are so glib
That it matters not least
If it’s truth or a fib.
So it’s lie through your teeth
Or its truth that you own.
It’s all in the gift
of the kissed Blarney Stone.

by Denise Rodgers
Copyright© Denise Rodgers
All Rights Reserved


The next funny Irish poem is a limerick about a man from Cork, Ireland. Some people think that limericks are Irish poems, because "Limerick" is a city in Ireland. However, despite its name, the limerick was first popularized in England, back in 1845, with Edward Lear's "Book of Nonsense." Please go to my limerick page to see an Edward Lear original, as well as a few limericks of my own. Better yet, go directly to my Irish Limericks page for a sampling of limericks about Ireland.

The following limerick, by yours truly, is just a funny irish poem about a very good eater from Cork, Ireland.

A Fellow from Cork
There once was a fellow from Cork
Who ate giant portions of pork,
Roasted beef and wild duck.
And his manners? Well, yuck!
Perhaps one day he’ll use a fork.

by Denise Rodgers

Copyright© Denise Rodgers

All Rights Reserved

Art courtesy of my kitchen drawer

The next funny Irish poem is about a kilt. Now, it's true that the Scottish are best known for wearing kilts, and not the Irish. But I've seen an Irishman wearing one with my own two eyes. An American Irishman, but an Irishman nonetheless.

Now, the very obvious question most women want to ask is exactly what is under that Irishman's kilt? One answer can be found at this web site. The following funny Irish poem (and illustration) tries to answer that question as well. Apparently a good gust of wind revealed the truth beneath Kermit's kilt...

Under Frog's Kilt

Under the Kilt
Tell me, what’s under an Irishman’s kilt?
Is it an item to cause him some guilt?
When he’s outdoors, does it get a bit breezy?
When windy and wild, does it get a bit sleazy?
Whether an old guy, or some well-built hottie,
Does winter wind makes bumps all over his body?
Well, that is my guess, in an Irishy lilt.
As I still do not know what is under that kilt!

by Denise Rodgers

Copyright© Denise Rodgers

All Rights Reserved

Photo courtesy of a good-natured frog



The next funny Irish poems is about Ireland's magical number "three." Although many people think that the Irish Shamrock is a four-leaf clover (for luck), the truth is that the legend of the shamrock comes from Saint Patrick who used the three-leaf clover to explain the trinity (Father, Son, Holy Spirit), using the clover to show how three entities could form as one.

There are some other notable "threes," as you will see in the following funny Irish poem.


Ireland’s Magical Three
The magic number is Ireland’s Three,
A wonderful grouping, between you and me.
Here is one version:
The Crone-Mother-Virgin.
All faithful will hear it:
Father, Son, Holy Spirit.
This is no rarity:
Faith, Hope and Charity.
Just one more fit
Is Love, Valor, Wit.
Read all these threesomes put down here to see,
The magical number of Ireland’s Three.

by Denise Rodgers

Copyright© Denise Rodgers

All Rights Reserved

Photo by Denise Rodgers

The next and final funny Irish poem on this page is about the famous leprechaun. The leprechaun, according to Irish folklore, is a tiny old man of about two feet in height, a cobbler (shoemaker) by trade, who is both mischievous and rich. Rich with a capital "R." These little guys are the owners of those pots of gold at the end of rainbows and in other cleverly hidden places.

According to Irish mythology, a leprechaun can be forced into sharing his gold with you. But, of course, there is a catch. In order to convince him to share, you must keep your eyes on him constantly. If you turn your head, he's likely to vanish in the blink of an eye.

Click the bear to see more Irish goodies.

The Leprechaun
The Leprechaun is an Irish faery
From down County Cork or from far Tipperary.
They’re tiny and short,
A mere two feet in height.
They work on their shoes
And their terrible fright
Is that you will stop by
And demand all their gold
All hidden away in a
Tree’s hollow hold.
They’re tricky and cleverTurn your eyes for a moment,
This faery will flee.
A plan that is better,
Truth to be told,
Just pay him a visit
And earn your own gold!

by Denise Rodgers

Copyright© Denise Rodgers

All Rights Reserved

I certainly hope that you've enjoyed this collection of funny Irish poems!



For more funny poems, please go to

Funny Irish Limericks

Funny Limericks

Funny Rhyming Poems

Funny Sonnets

Onomatopoeia Poems


For more funny Irish poems and funny poems on all subjects,
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